E.

I'm on Twitter, Linked in and Google+. I have a Pinterest account because, obviously, we are all supposed to. I am also on Quora. If that wasn't enough, here is an About.me page. I have also been a martial arts practitioner for a very long time, a Masters Hall of Fame inductee. I also write in my spare time, but don't be alarmed, it's going nowhere.

cinephilearchive:

1998 DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola was the subject of the Guild’s 75th Anniversary event on March 26, 2011. Coppola, the winner of two DGA Feature Film Awards (‘The Godfather’ and ‘The Godfather Part II’) and multiple nominations (‘The Conversation’; ‘Apocalypse Now’; ‘The Godfather Part III’) was honored at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. As a producer, Coppola worked to provide young independent filmmakers freedom from studio interference. He was also a pioneer of technological filmmaking advances like pre-visualization, word processing for screenplays, electronic editing and experimentation with high definition. “Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time,” said DGA President Taylor Hackford in his welcome. “His work has helped shape contemporary cinema around the world.”

Coppola was joined onstage by directors Paul Thomas Anderson (‘There Will Be Blood’), Catherine Hardwicke (‘Red Riding Hood’) and David O. Russell (‘The Fighter’), for a conversation about the impact his films had on their own careers and others of their generation. Each of the directors presented clips from Coppola’s work to form the basis of their conversation. 75th Anniversary Advisory Committee Chair Michael Apted served as moderator. “Francis’ influence lies not only in the awards he’s won or the films he’s directed, but also in the example he’s set for young directors,” said Apted. Ever humble, the legendary director attributed much of his success to his creative collaborators. “Film is an ensemble,” said Coppola. “You’re the ringleader, but hopefully you have all of this wonderful work coming out of people whom you inspire, but also inspire you.” —The Impact of Francis Ford Coppola on the Next Generation, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event
Click on image below for full video coverage of the DGA 75th Anniversary event honoring Francis Ford Coppola (1:29:57).

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephilearchive:

1998 DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola was the subject of the Guild’s 75th Anniversary event on March 26, 2011. Coppola, the winner of two DGA Feature Film Awards (‘The Godfather’ and ‘The Godfather Part II’) and multiple nominations (‘The Conversation’; ‘Apocalypse Now’; ‘The Godfather Part III’) was honored at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. As a producer, Coppola worked to provide young independent filmmakers freedom from studio interference. He was also a pioneer of technological filmmaking advances like pre-visualization, word processing for screenplays, electronic editing and experimentation with high definition. “Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time,” said DGA President Taylor Hackford in his welcome. “His work has helped shape contemporary cinema around the world.”

Coppola was joined onstage by directors Paul Thomas Anderson (‘There Will Be Blood’), Catherine Hardwicke (‘Red Riding Hood’) and David O. Russell (‘The Fighter’), for a conversation about the impact his films had on their own careers and others of their generation. Each of the directors presented clips from Coppola’s work to form the basis of their conversation. 75th Anniversary Advisory Committee Chair Michael Apted served as moderator. “Francis’ influence lies not only in the awards he’s won or the films he’s directed, but also in the example he’s set for young directors,” said Apted. Ever humble, the legendary director attributed much of his success to his creative collaborators. “Film is an ensemble,” said Coppola. “You’re the ringleader, but hopefully you have all of this wonderful work coming out of people whom you inspire, but also inspire you.” —The Impact of Francis Ford Coppola on the Next Generation, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event

Click on image below for full video coverage of the DGA 75th Anniversary event honoring Francis Ford Coppola (1:29:57).

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Oh nothing, just honing his DARK SIDE powers…

cinephilearchive:

In the final episode of ‘Breaking Bad’ there are two shots in a pivotal scene that are perfect examples of how to use camera movement to amplify the narrative and surprise the audience. With one simple pan and one simple dolly there is a set-up and shortly after, a dramatic pay-off. The scene at first appears to be just conveying information to the viewer. Then, with one pan and one dolly move the scene is flipped on its head and is seen in a whole new light. This could only happen through writing, direction, set design and camera movement working in unison. A Steadicam or crane shot through a window could never have achieved the emotional impact of a simple pan and dolly. —Vashi Nedomansky, ‘Breaking Bad’ – Motivated Camera Movement

Continue reading at VashiVisuals

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going: